Saturday, June 15, 2013

The Damn Truth

"Many athletes feel that coaches hold them back or redirect their attention to unnecessary fundamentals, technical basics, and activities that seem to have little or no relevance to what they want to do. This, however, is the true art of coaching."
- G. Cook

Friday, June 14, 2013

Thyroid Surgery

Have been out for a while. Between studying, practicing, and health issues, I needed some timeout. However, after thyroid surgery, I am feeling great just 3 days out.
Drum roll please....The man of the hour and the reason for my quick recovery:
John I. Lew, M.D. F.A.C.S.
Associate Professor of Surgery
Director, Fellowship in Endocrine Surgery
University of Miami|Miller School of Medicine

305.243.4211
Clinical Research Building (M875)
1120 NW 14th Street, 4th Floor
Miami, FL 33136

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Acute Variables of Training–Tempo, Rest Intervals & Training Volume - The Basics of Weight Training

Continued from April 2 Article: Acute Variables of Training–REPS, SETS, and INTENSITY–The Basics of Weight Training

Let me begin by saying, and this applies to the previous article I wrote about The Basics of Weight Training, that I follow the OPT Model which is the NASM model for training. A brilliant little system consisting of 3 levels and 5 phases of training. The OPT applies to pretty much all types of training: weight training, plyometric training, balance, and S.A.Q. Each training variable has a corresponding use in each phase of training within the model. This article should be read with the previous article in mind. Each phase should be used for approximately 4 weeks before moving on to the next – all of the training variables covered in these articles are used in each phase with different adaptations to achieve. Some beginners may find that they need more time in each phase. That’s ok. The idea is to adapt to each phase before moving on to the next phase in order to reduce injury occurrence. In the final article of this series I will give a recap of all the variables and give a sample workout that illustrates these concepts for better understanding.

The levels and phases of the OPT are as follows:

Level 1 Phase 1 Stabilization Training (beginners, and experienced trainees alike, should never avoid this phase. This is probably the most important phase applicable to reduce injuries and overtraining.)

Level II Phase 2 Muscular Endurance

Level II Phase 3 Hypertrophy (for large muscle gains; more advanced lifters who have been through the previous 2 phases)

Level II Phase 4 Maximal Strength

Level III Phase 5 Power Training

 

TEMPO

Tempo is the speed with which each repetition is performed. Different tempos achieve different results. For example , heavy or light weights performed as fast as possible (as fast as can be a controlled, in form movement) are good for the adaptation of power. In fact, these two techniques are used in supersets for building power. Tempo is important in the program that you follow because the tempo you use will dictate much of the adaptation you will benefit from. When your tempo is slower, for example a 4/2/1 tempo (a/a/a = first tempo is eccentric motion, second is isometric (the hold in the middle) and third is concentric (force) muscle action), your building for muscular endurance, which is a good tempo to start with when you have never worked out or are starting over after a long time of being out. This tempo helps to build stabilizer muscles which are extremely important when you are going to continue to a heavier workout in the next phase. Don’t underestimate the importance of starting with lighter weights at a slower tempo when you begin weight training. It’s this phase that is going to keep you from reducing injuries in the following phases. It also gives you time to work out any muscle imbalances that you may have. Lighter weights, slower tempo prepare you for the heavy stuff. In this phase you’ll also try to improve your technique so that when your lifting heavier weights you know your technique is on the mark.

4/2/1 tempo is used for stabilization and muscle endurance building the right muscles for heavier lifting later.

2/0/2 tempo will be used in building hypertrophy (big muscles)

x/x/x (as fast as possible without breaking form/technique(A.F.A.P.); used for strength training)

x/x/x is also used for power training. Athletes looking to build power for sports are going to eventually cycle their program to this level. At this level supersetting a heavy set followed by a lighter set  is a technique used for building power in the body.

 

REST INTERVALS

Ahhhh rest. The importance of rest. I can’t stress enough about this other than DO IT. You must rest properly. It’s part of the process and something a lot of people underestimate and don’t do enough of. Hence, overtraining syndrome. Yuck. I hate it. The next day I am so cranky and tired and pissed that I can’t get my sexy ass to the gym…Cortisol build up, fatigue, moodiness, sleepiness, etc. Sometimes I’ll need a few days off after overtraining. It’s like the hangover that won’t go away. If you’re a freak about training (yes, I have done it too – guilty) then you’ve committed this nasty little sin to your temple. Even though I know it’s bad poop happens.

Here, however, I’m specifically talking about the rest INTERVALS that you take in between your sets or circuits. Rest intervals have a big impact on your workout and adaptation and can really make the difference in size gains and/or calorie loss.

When you’re working with muscular endurance or stabilization, you want to rest about 90 second between your sets.

For hypertrophy the ideal rest is 60 seconds, unless you are working the large muscles, legs or back, and using heavy sets, you may need a few more seconds to recover your energy.

When working for strength or power, as said in my previous article, you are using 85 to 100% of your 1RM, your rest intervals should increase to 3 to 5 minutes in between sets.

 

TRAINING VOLUME

When speaking of training volume we are referring to the amount of training that is completed within a certain period of time, a week, for example. It is training volume that uses concepts like “2-day, 3-day, 4-day” and so forth, split routines. Split routines will work the individual body parts on certain days of the week. For example, a 6-day split routine will have the following workout:

Monday and Thursday – Biceps, triceps and shoulders (using “push-pull” methods)

Tuesday and Friday – Chest and Back (using “push-pull” methods)

Wednesday and Saturday – Legs (again, “push-pull” methods)

This example workout would complete your training volume for the week.

 

Remember this article is a continuance of the previous article and should be used as cumulative type of primer. All the variables must be considered in order to create a proper and safe routine.

In the next article of this series I will cover training frequency, training duration and exercise selection. A following article will be posted that will give a recap complete with examples of all the variables used together in a sample routine and I will also cover the concept of “push-pull”, which is a very important method, I believe, when training in order to reduce injuries and muscle imbalances.

 

Got Questions? Email me: mel@betterbodzfitness.com

Mel Jimenez

NASM Certified Personal Trainer

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Serena Williams does it Again @ SONY OPEN 2013

Yep, she’s done it again!! Six time winner at Sony Open, Serena Williams, the number one player in the world of women’s tennis, wins once again.

On Saturday the final score between Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova was: 4-6, 6-3, 6-0.

Although she didn’t win this time, Sharapova showed incredible athleticism and focus in the finals against Serena winning the first set; Hats off to Maria, she played a good game.

Serena at Sony Open 2013                     Maria at Sony Open 2013-Blog

Pictures by Mel Jimenez

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Acute Variables of Training–REPS, SETS, and INTENSITY–The Basics of Weight Training

Acute variables of training are the components that are manipulated in a workout for a specific desired adaptation. They are almost always, if not definitely, formulaic. Acute variables are manipulated and modified to achieve the specific levels of fitness desired. The first three of these acute variables of training reviewed are REPETITIONS, SETS, and INTENSITY. Now, exercise selection (the type of exercise you do) is a very important part of your training, and is also an acute variable, but we’ll cover that later on down the road. For the purposes of making this article as short and sweet as possible, we’ll just be covering REPS, SETS, and INTENSITY and how they pertain to your desired results/adaptations.

Each time you complete a REPETITION it becomes part of an overall scheme to achieve certain specific results. Those REPS (acute variable) differ depending on what results you are seeking, i.e., muscle endurance, hypertrophy (muscle enlargement), strength, or power. Now, you can’t just complete random REPS  and hope you’ll get your desired outcome without having consideration for the amount of SETS and INTENSITY that should be involved. All the variables together create a program design; They all go hand in hand, as you’ll see. All acute variables are interdependent.

Together with SETS and INTENSITY, different REPETITION schemes will achieve different types of adaptations. Together SETS and REPS determine the INTENSITY of the workout.

A REPETITION can be defined as a complete movement of  a certain exercise. REPS are simply a way to count the number of movements in a given SET and are also a means to count the time the muscles are under tension (time under tension). A SET is simply defined as a group of consecutive REPETITIONS. And, TRAINING INTENSITY is defined as an individual’s level of effort compared to their 1 REPETITION MAXIMUM, which is the amount of weight you can complete 1 REP of before going to failure. In other words, your 100% maximum effort. Your TRAINING INTENSITY is a percentage of your 1RM (1 REP MAXIMUM), simply, the amount of weight or range of weight that you will train in using a specific amount of REPS and SETS.

For each adaptation, a specific number of REPS, SETS, and INTENSITY are used for achieving fitness goals. “Research demonstrates that training in a specific  REPETITION range yields specific adaptations. Therefore, depending on the goal of the individual…it is possible to define a specific REPETITION range ” (NASM).

Here are the following adaptations: Muscle endurance, hypertrophy, strength, and power. All of these adaptations have specific acute variables to be followed in ordered to be achieved.

Muscular endurance will be best developed by applying a scheme of 12-20 REPS using 50-70% of your 1RM and completing 1-3 sets per exercise/body part. 

Hypertrophy (enlargement of muscles – what most guys want) is best achieved using a REP scheme of 6-12, while pushing 75-85% of your 1RM and completing 3-5 SETS per exercise/body part.

Strength is usually achieved using a 1-5 REP scheme, 85-100% of your 1RM, and completing anywhere between 4-6 SETS.

Power adaptations are accomplished by using explosive movements, this is why the weight is considerably lower than in other adaptations. Adaptations of power require that you use a REP scheme of 1-10, using 30-45% of your 1RM, and completing 3-6 SETS. You can also combine this scheme with a SUPERSET. A SUPERSET is simply two exercises, in this case used on the same muscle, back to back without any rest in between. In both consecutive SETS you are going to use explosive tempos.

Here is an example of a SUPERSET with acute training variables for a power adaptation.

LEGS:

Barbell Squat @ 85-100% Intensity, 1-5 REPS, 3-5 SETS

Squat Jump @ Bodyweight (a much lighter weight) 8-10 REPS, 3-5 SETS

Perform your first SET of Barbell Squats @ 1- 5 REPS at a speed that is as fast as can be controlled and then immediately, and without rest,  move to complete your first SET of Squat Jumps with a REP range of 8-10, also as fast as can be controlled. This would complete your first SUPERSET of 3-5 SETS.

The concept for power training here is that by using both heavy loads with explosive movements and low-resistance with a high velocity, power output can be methodically enhanced.

Next time we’ll cover TRAINING TEMPO, TRAINING VOLUME, AND REST INTERVAL. Also super important in this game.

Got Questions? Email me: mel@betterbodzfitness.com

 

Mel Jimenez

NASM Certified Personal Trainer

Saturday, March 16, 2013

2012 TOP PAID UFC FIGHTERS–Written by Bloguin’s Jeff Fox

2012 Fighter Salaries: Top 10 Earners

Written by Jeff Fox on Saturday, 05 January 2013 17:27.
jon jones & rashad evans staredown
2012 is done and gone, and mirror, mirror on the wall, who's the richest MMA fighter of them all?  We've got the answer, of course.
We've compiled all fighter salaries from the big two (soon to be one) MMA companies in North America, the UFC and Strikeforce (Bellator's fighters don't make the big bucks), to see which fighter got the fattest pockets in 2012.  It is worth noting that these are only the reported salaries plus Fight of the Night, Knockout of the Night and Submission of the Night bonuses that have been made public.  Many top performing fighters get additional bonuses paid out to them that aren't reported, plus the top guys get a cut of the pay-per-view buys for events that they headline (not to mention every fighter makes sponsorship money).  Also, many athletic commissions don't report fighter's salary info, so for those we've estimated a fighter's purse based on what they have earned in their other recent fights.  Fighters with some estimated purses are marked with a * beside their name.  This data should still be considered very close to accurate, as most fighters' purses remain rather steady from fight to fight (unless they ink a new contract in the meantime).  
With all those disclaimers out of the way, here are the top 10 highest earning fighters in 2012, as well as the top 10 for the UFC and Strikeforce.
TO SEE 2013's TOP 10 EARNERS, CLICK HERE.
TO SEE SALARY INFO FOR ALL 381 MEN WHO FOUGHT IN THE UFC IN 2012, CLICK HERE.
TO SEE OUR ALL-TIME UFC SALARY DATABASE, CLICK HERE.
Overall Top Ten Earning Fighters in 2012
1
Jon Jones*
$   865,000
2
Rashad Evans*
$   710,000
3
Michael Bisping*
$   700,000
4
Hector Lombard*
$   600,000
4
Junior dos Santos
$   600,000
6
Vitor Belfort*
$   554,000
7
Anderson Silva*
$   475,000
8
Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira*
$   470,000
8
Georges St-Pierre*
$   470,000
10
Mauricio Rua
$   415,000
UFC Top Ten Earning Fighters in 2012
1
Jon Jones*
$   865,000
2
Rashad Evans*
$   710,000
3
Michael Bisping*
$   700,000
4
Hector Lombard*
$   600,000
4
Junior dos Santos
$   600,000
6
Vitor Belfort*
$   554,000
7
Anderson Silva*
$   475,000
8
Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira*
$   470,000
8
Georges St-Pierre*
$   470,000
10
Mauricio Rua
$   415,000
Strikeforce Top Ten Earning Fighters in 2012
(data updated to Rousey vs Kaufman)

1
Robbie Lawler
$   244,940
2
Josh Barnett
$   200,000
3
Luke Rockhold
$   189,925
4
Ronaldo Souza
$   186,000
5
Gilbert Melendez
$   175,000
6
Josh Thomson
$   170,000
7
Tyron Woodley
$   103,425
8
Daniel Cormier
$   100,000
9
Ronda Rousey
$    72,000
10
Roger Gracie
$    69,940



































Wednesday, January 30, 2013

ACUTE VARIABLES OF TRAINING


“Acute variables are the most fundamental components of designing a training program. They determine the amount of stress placed on the body and, ultimately, what adaptations the body will incur. The body will specifically adapt to the demands placed on it (known also as the principle of specificity). The acute variables applied during an exercise program will dictate these demands and the adaptations achieved.”
  • Repetitions
  • Sets
  • Training Intensity
  • Repetition Tempo
  • Training Volume
  • Rest Interval
  • Training Frequency
  • Training Duration
  • Exercise Selection
The following posts will describe in detail each of these acute training variables and how they affect adaptations.

National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM)
NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training, Fourth Edition.

Thursday, January 17, 2013

Today’s Lunch

Spinach Salad - Today's Lunch 2

Today’s Salad Ingredients:

spinach, broccoli sprouts, sunflower shoots, blackberries, strawberries, blueberries, black-eyed peas,

scoop of fat-free cottage cheese, soy nuts, bits of dried pineapple and papaya. Viola!

Berries are low in fructose, carbs, and rich in fiber and anti-oxidants, so enjoy a healthy amount.

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Why Carbohydrates are so Important

"...high-glycemic carbohydrates can serve as nutrient activators. Consuming high-glycemic carbohydrates following exercise stimulates insulin, one of the most important regulators of protein synthesis following exercise. When insulin is stimulated in the presence of protein, the result is greater synthesis of new protein. In other words, carbohydrates prime the protein pump by first stimulating insulin. A complex carbohydrate is less effective because it is a weaker stimulator of insulin..."

-Nutrient Timing

John Ivy, Ph.D., & Robert Portman, Ph.D.

Today’s Lunch

Spinach Salald - Today's Lunch

Today’s Salad Ingredients:

spinach, pea shoots, sunflower shoots, blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, raw walnuts, scoop of Greek olive humus, and black-eyed peas.

Nice combination of raw, the right carbs, and protein. Viola!